if(!isset($_COOKIE["returnvisit"]) && $x=='bghi_home') header('Location: http://bghi.us/bghi_intro.php'); else ?>


Google
 
Web www.bghi.us
This web site is best viewed at a resolution of 1280 x 1024

HOME / STATS
BGHI Home Page
My Weather Station
BGHI Site Map
Server Yearly Stats
Disclaimer

HUNTING PICS
A Hunter's View ...
... Photo Galleries

HUNTING BLOGS
My Hunting Blog

HUNTING HUMOR
Humor Area

HUNTING MISC.
Hunting Links
IBO v AMO
What is a Trophy?
Deer Haulin' Truck
Whitetail Facts
Hunting Fitness
Canon A80 Review

TRAIL CAMERAS
Leaf River IR-3BU
Moultrie I-40
Stealth I230 (STC-WD2)

EQUIPMENT & TIPS
Hunting Gear
Hunting Tips

ONLINE RESOURCES
Online forums

COMPOUND BOW
Mathews Ultra2

AIR GUNS
IZH-46M Match Air Pistol
Avanti 747 Match Air Pistol
BAM XS-B3-1 Custom Air Rifle
DIY Silent Pellet Trap

BLACK POWDER
CVA .50 Cal. Accura V2
Lyman .54 Cal. GPR
CVA .50 Cal. Buckhorn

Colt 1860 Army
Remington 1858 New Army

Schematic - 1860
Schematic - 1858

C&B Accessories
My GPR Possibles Bag
C&B Primer
C&B Cost Calculator
Supplies & Possibles
Civil War Pistols Screensaver

HAND GUNS
Dan Wesson Mod.15
Taurus 66SS6
Taurus 44SS6
Taurus PT92SS
Ruger KMK678GC

LONG GUNS
Mossberg 20g Slugster
Beretta 12g Model A303
Remington 12g 870-LH
Marlin .22LR 7000
Marlin .22LR 2000L

MANUALS
Gun Owner Manuals

HAND RELOADING
DIY $30 Reloading Bench
Reloading Cost Calculator
Ammo Comparison
38 Sp Load Data
357 Mag Load Data
44 Mag Load Data

TARGETS
Downloadable Targets

Remington '1858' New Army

REMINGTON '1858' NEW ARMY
UBERTI BLACKPOWDER REPRODUCTION REVOLVER





Remington Arms Company didn't introduce its new more powerful 44-caliber (Note 1) New Army model revolver until late 1862. The patent was acquired in 1858 and stamped on the revolver and thus was wrongly referred to as the '1858' model. However, the rugged, solid framed Remington with its quick-release cylinder became very popular with the fighting soldiers. Between 1862 and 1865, 115,557 were procured by the Union Ordanance Department at a cost per unit of $15.00 for the vast majority of the government contracts. Many were illegally sold to or otherwise obtained by Confederate forces. The New Army was considered quite a technologically advanced weapon in its day.

Reproductions in most makes and models come with steel or brass frames or in stainless. To be historically accurate these revolvers were only made with steel frames. I chose the steel blued only for the reason of a little more authenticity.

Steel and stainless frames tend to wear less with prolonged use.
Kirst and R&D make cylinder converters so your Remington New Army can shoot .45 Long Colt, .45 Colt Schofield cowboy loads or even blanks for Civil War reenactments. These cartridge converters CANNOT be used in brass frame revolvers.

Note 1 : Designated as .44-Caliber, it is actually .45-Caliber, using a .451" - .457" lead ball

 

 

TECHNICAL SPECIFICATIONS

Caliber: .44 (~.454" lead ball)
Barrel Length: 8"
No. of Grooves: 7
Twist: Left
Total Length: 13.6"
Weight: 2.7 lbs.
Cylinder: 6-shot
Grip: Two-piece walnut
Finish: Frame - Blued
Barrel - Blued
Backstrap - Blued
Trigger Guard - Brass

 

 

My wife bought me this as a Valentine's Day gift (gotta love that). Straight out of the box and first impressions were great. Finish was superb, not a mark on it and bluing was also excellent. Cylinder play etc on this steel frame model was quite tight also.

Being use to cartridge pistol and revolver shooting this is really a lot slower and is a very relaxing way to spend an afternoon at the range. Shooting at 25 yards and I was surprised how accurate these guns are. At 25 yards this particular revolver shoots at approximately center and 4 to 5 inches low. Not too shabby considering the sights it has. Filing down the front blade sight a lick at a time raised the POI (Point Of Impact) to pretty well spot-on and now consistantly hits 6" falling plates aiming right on center to a couple of inches above center.

Because of the ease in which the quick-release cylinder comes out of this gun I choose to remove the cylinder from the gun and load this using a Pietta loading jig (seen here). I also bought a spare cylinder and load 2 cylinders at a time to get a bit more shooting between reloads. I have been using 24 grains (by volume, NOT weight) of Hodgdon 777 powder but now use 24 to 30 grains of Hodgdon Pyrodex P, a 45-caliber lubricated Wonder Wad and a Hornady .454" lead ball. Percussion cap is a Remington #10 (pinched slightly for a firmer fit on the nipple). It should be noted that Triple 7 is a black powder subsitute and Hodgdon recommends a max of 25 grains and not to use fillers . Hodgdon also states to reduce loads by 15% when using 777 instead of blackpowder. Remember to always work up to maximum loads for safety. Of course for safety on both my blackpowder pistols I always cap off the top of each cylinder with commercial muzzleloader lube or ye olde Crisco as a very much cheaper alternative to help prevent chain fires and add some additional lubrication in the barrel.

The 'Remmie' is a tight fit for large hands when compared to the Colt 1860 but once use to it is not a problem.

Overall I believe this gun represents an outstanding value for money at $265 and I also believe by treating it right and cleaning thoroughly after each and every use will give me years of shooting enjoyment.








Copyright 2005-2014 www.bghi.us. All rights reserved.